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Tag Archives: Times Past

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Highway of History (access required)

Travelers driving on U.S. Highway 180 (aka Fort Valley Road) near Flagstaff are greeted with a mix of rustic-looking buildings, wooden cattle fences and open space as the road carves a route through the ponderosa pine forest. While the times have changed, the panoramas that gripped homesteaders in the 1880s and influenced the historic road's route still amaze.

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Bird Man of Tombstone (access required)

Some of Tombstone's most famous gun fighters, including the Earps, Doc Holliday, Billy Claiborne and Johnny Ringo all patronized Hafford Saloon, which became one of the most popular watering holes in Tombstone. But the establishment is notable for another reason entirely.

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Paradise, Arizona (access required)

In 1940, the year this photograph was taken, an unidentified scribe noted "a score of weather-worn frame buildings scattered along the narrow, winding mountain road" that snakes through Paradise.

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Baron of Arizona (access required)

When it came to an appetite for ill-gotten gains, James Addison Reavis, the self-proclaimed Baron of Arizona, was in a class by himself.

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3 generations of photographers in the Old Pueblo (access required)

Arriving in Tucson seven years before the railroad, frontier photographer Henry Buehman captured the rapidly vanishing frontier on film. His son Albert Buehman continued the family tradition and gained international renown. Grandson Remick rounded out an 80-year family legacy.

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Tucson Fire Department (access required)

The Tucson Fire Association, Tucson Fire Company and Tucson Hook and Ladder Company formed the first Tucson fire department under the fumes of cigar smoke in the Gem Saloon on Congress Street in the early 1880s. While the volunteers had the will to fight fires, technology and city support still needed to catch up.

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The prowl of the ‘Velvet Tigress’ (access required)

Leading up to Halloween in 1939, Phoenix was enthralled with the first of several escapes by a female prisoner newspapers delighted in describing as the "Trunk Murderess," "Tiger Woman," "Blond Tigress," "Velvet Tigress" and "Mad Killer."

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NAU’s George Washington connection (access required)

George Washington assumed command of the Continental Army under an Ulmus Americana Elm tree in Cambridge, Mass., on July 3, 1775. The tree died in October 1923, but foresighted botanists made sure its legacy lived on at universities across the United States, including the campus at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff.

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City-county building (access required)

At the end of October of 1929, a $1.5 million (approximately $18.7 million today) structure, described as "...an inspiration for better government and a symbol of progress and prosperity," was dedicated at Central Avenue and Washington Street in downtown Phoenix.

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Arizona life circa 1907 (access required)

In 1907, the territory of Arizona had fewer than 200,000 residents. However, there seemed to be a number of interesting characters that kept the local newspapers busy. In Tucson, "...a jury of 12 good citizens" decided that cowboys and miners coming into town had two hours to remove their weapons.

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