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Tag Archives: tombstone

Wyatt Earp (access required)

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Although millions of words have been written about Wyatt Earp, precious little is known about the man behind the myth. Tombstone aficionados will argue endlessly about which side of the law he was on. But few have paid attention to or written about his life after the gunfight that made him famous.

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Hello Tombstone, Hello Bisbee (access required)

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On July 19, 1902, Tombstone and Bisbee were finally linked by telephone. The mayors of the two towns, like all good politicians, were there for the ceremony. Abraham Hyman Emanuel, mayor of Tombstone talked with Mayor Josiah Muirhead of Bisbee and at 8 p.m. that evening in the first long distance call between the two communities.

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Tombstone’s Bird Cage Theatre (access required)

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In its heyday between 1881 and 1889, the Bird Cage – replete with wallpaper imported from Paris, massive grand piano, orchestra pit, box seats and well-stocked bar – was the most famous honky-tonk in America.

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Tombstone’s Bird Cage Theater

Eddie Foy, a famous vaudeville actor who performed at the Bird Cage Theater.

Tombstone’s most celebrated theater was the Bird Cage. In its heyday between 1881 and 1889, the theater offered gambling, liquor, vaudeville entertainment and ladies of the night. In 1882, ~The New York Times~ referred to the Bird Cage as “the Roughest, Bawdiest and Most Wicked Night Spot between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast.”

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Tombstone striking out in courts in water fight

Tombstone calls itself "the town too tough to die" thanks to an Old West history that includes the shootout at the OK Corral, but the tiny southeastern Arizona city says the health and safety of its modern-day residents are imperiled by unreasonable U.S. Forest Service officials.

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Tombstone’s deadliest gunfighter

John Peters Ringo — famously known as Johnny Ringo and dubbed Tombstone’s deadliest gunfighter — first turned up in Arizona at a bar in Safford in 1878, where he offered a whiskey to a man seated next to him. The unarmed man declined and said he preferred beer. Ringo then drew his pistol and fired, nicking the man’s ear. When the case came before a grand jury, Ringo did not appear.

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