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Health insurance tax needs to be delayed

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$62,500. That’s the annual cost my company, bluemedia, would pay the federal government yearly in excess taxes if not for Congresswoman Kyrsten Sinema.

These costs are a direct result of the health insurance tax that unfairly targets small businesses and the health care we purchase for our employees. Congresswoman Sinema knows this tax hurts small businesses, which is why she has advocated for getting rid of it. And while she is still working toward the permanent repeal, she was instrumental in getting a temporary suspension of the tax for the current year, saving small businesses like mine funds that we used to reinvest in our companies.

Now, as the previous tax delay is set to expire at the end of this year, we once again ask Congress to pass another delay of this harmful tax for 2018, one that can be done through the upcoming Continuing Resolution to fund the government.

Sinema has been supportive of Arizona’s small businesses and we are grateful to her for that. We know she is working to delay the health insurance tax for another year and we hope her colleagues in Congress follow her lead – America’s small business owners are counting on you!

— R.J. Orr is a partner and vice-president of sales for bluemedia.

 

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The views expressed in guest commentaries are those of the author and are not the views of the Arizona Capitol Times.

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