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Court forces UA to hand over climate-change emails of scientists


The University of Arizona has been ordered to surrender emails by two UA scientists that a group claims will help prove that theories about human-caused climate change are false and part of a conspiracy.

Pima County Superior Court Judge James Marner rejected arguments by attorneys for the Board of Regents that disclosure of the documents would be “contrary to the best interests of the state.”

Marner said it may be true that some of the documents sought by Energy & Environment Legal Institute might be classified as unpublished research, manuscripts, preliminary analyses, drafts of scientific papers and plans for future research.

But the judge said the subject matter of the documents has become available to the general public. And that Marner said, does not allow the university to withhold disclosure under a separate section of the law governing university records.

There was no immediate response from the university.

The ruling is actually a turnabout for Marner who had previously ruled that some emails were properly withheld because they contained things like confidential information or attorney work product. And he said at the time that the university did not act arbitrarily or capriciously in witholding other documents, including unpublished data, research, drafts and commentary.

But last year the state Court of Appeals told Marner to take another look.

Appellate Judge Joseph Howard, writing for the unanimous court, said it’s legally irrelevant what university officials thought was appropriate to disclose.

He said everyone involved in the case acknowledges that the emails from Malcolm Hughes, who is still with the UA, and Jonathan Overpeck who left earlier this year, are public records. And Howard said state law carries a presumption that all public records are subject to disclosure, with certain exceptions.

That, Howard said, required Marner to actually examine the records to determine whether making them public would harm “the best interests of the state,” as the university has claimed.

Craig Richardson, president of E & E, said the request all relates to so-called “hockey stick” research. It drew its name from graphs that climate scientists say show a long-term decline in global temperatures over most of the last 150 years followed by a sharp rise.

“It’s the foundational argument for really this whole climate change industry and their focus,” he said.

What happened is in 2009 some computer servers at the University of East Anglia in Britain were hacked and emails stolen, with the names of the two UA scientists found in the mix. Some of what was found was labeled “climategate” and is being used by groups to show that global warming is just a conspiracy.

“They showed there were a lot of games being played with the data,” Richardson said.

He said that getting all the emails, including from the two scientists will reveal “an unvarnished view of how the process works … and how climate scientists on the other side of this have been shut out.”

Richardson said he is not denying that the climate is changing.

“It has been for 4.5 billion years,” he said. “The question is what’s causing it.”

He contends that the research studies putting the entire blame on carbon dioxide emissions is flawed. More to the point, Richardson contends that accepting those findings as truth — and basing public policy on them — would have dire consequences in the United States. He said that already is playing out in Europe where “electricity rates are skyrocketing” because of moves away from carbon-produced fuels.

E & E describes itself as a nonprofit that engages in litigation to hold accountable “those who seek excessive and destructive government regulation that’s based on agenda-driving policy making, junk science and hysteria.”


  1. Wonderful news!

  2. Universities should not aid and abet ideologically-driven extremists like E&E.
    Full disclosure needs to be encourage and, if necessary, enforced.

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