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Starbucks drinks now served at Capitol coffee shop

The Capitol coffee shop is now serving Starbucks drinks and may soon have televisions showing legislative hearings. (Photo by Rachel Leingang/Arizona Capitol Times)

The Capitol coffee shop is now serving Starbucks drinks and may soon have televisions showing legislative hearings. (Photo by Rachel Leingang/Arizona Capitol Times)

Starbucks lovers, rejoice!

The coffee shop in Arizona’s Old Capitol is now serving Starbucks drinks and may soon have televisions showing legislative hearings.

The shop, located across from the Capitol Museum on the first floor of the Old Capitol building, is operated by Darrin Warrilow through the state’s Business Enterprise Program, which gives people who are legally blind contracts to run food service and concessions for the state.

The coffee shop opened its door – it literally has just one door – in early 2017. It was previously serving drinks from Kahala Coffee Traders.

Secretary of State Michele Reagan, whose office oversees the Old Capitol, said she wants to add two TVs to allow people visiting or working at the Capitol to watch House and Senate hearings.

She said she’s not sure when the TVs will be up and running.

“I want to get them up on the wall before anybody has an opinion on what I can or can’t do,” Reagan said. The process of opening the cafe took more time than expected and involved four different government agencies.

While the cafe now offers Starbucks drinks, Reagan said it’s not an official Starbucks corporate location. People can’t use Starbucks gift cards there, the Arizona Capitol Times confirmed this morning.

Since the shop opened last year, Reagan said it has helped increase traffic at the museum and the museum’s store, which recently turned a profit for the first time.

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