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Senate bill would shine light on reasons for abortions

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As a professional medical association of over 4,000 obstetrician/gynecologists and other reproductive health care professionals, the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists urges Arizona lawmakers to pass Senate Bill 1394, and find out the real effects of elective abortion on the women of Arizona.

Donna Harrison

Donna Harrison

Across this nation, the complications and deaths from elective abortion are hidden from analysis due to lack of transparency, and lack of enforcement of abortion reporting requirements.

Currently there are two sources of data available for analysis by policymakers – one set comes from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and is based on voluntary reporting from abortion providers, and a second set of data comes from the Guttmacher Institute, the research arm of Planned Parenthood, which also comes from voluntary reporting by abortion providers. Neither of these data sets agree.

To date, there is minimal accurate data about the effects of elective abortion on the women of Arizona.

For the state of Arizona to make intelligent decisions about the effects of elective abortion on the women of Arizona requires that real and verifiable information be required of abortion providers about complications and deaths. Such data is available for every other medical procedure except elective abortion.

Christina Francis

Christina Francis

Despite the spin that women seek abortion freely of their own choice, the reality is that many abortions are coerced, due to pressure from family, domestic partner or financial constraints. Only by understanding what pressures Arizona woman into abortion can effective policy decisions be made which remove the pressures for abortion. In addition, the human sex trafficking industry relies heavily on access to elective abortion to manage their “herd.” Information about coercion can reveal vitally important data which could lead to decrease or elimination of the sex trafficking industry in Arizona.

Thus the questions about why women are seeking abortion become vitally important to making a real difference in the health and safety of Arizona women.

Why do abortion providers fear such data collection? If elective abortion were as “safe” as the abortion industry claims, why would abortionists fear transparency? Yet, the abortion industry fights transparency tooth and nail, out of fear that the real effects of elective abortion on women would be exposed. Without accurate information about deaths and complications from abortion, lawmakers are at the mercy of the marketing spin of Planned Parenthood, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the elective abortion industry.

— Donna Harrison, M.D., is executive director of the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr. Christina Francis is board chairwoman, American Association of Pro-life Obstetricians and Gynecologists

One comment

  1. Why women seek abortion is nobody’s effing business. ABORTION IS LEGAL. Stop this hypocritical mewling. I resent my government spending any time at all on this issue. Your personal beliefs are yours and yours alone. Stop foisting them on the rest of us. How about taking care of the living for a change. Embryos do not have human rights, nor do they need protection. The living child needs more protection now. They are the ones being slaughtered, neglected, abused, thrown away……………..

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