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Home / Opinion / Commentary / No matter the vote, empowerment scholarships have helped many

3 comments

  1. Just a question — what do empowerment scholarships accomplish that charter schools cannot provide?

  2. The vote in November would not end the scholarships. A NO vote is to keep our taxes in the public education system, whether for public or charter schools.

    As currently written, there is no requirement to say why children would attend a non-public school. Therefore, state taxes would be handed over to wealthy Arizonans to help defray their costs in sending their children to expensive private schools…to which they would send them anyway.

    Currently, these rich parents pay the full price of their child’s tuition. No state money is used in supporting them. Under this dreadful bill, state education money would be spent in sending them to their tony schools…dollars that would come out of what is budgeted to educate Arizona children in our public school system.

    A yes vote means the 1% win again at the expense of the 99%.

  3. If Proposition 305 passes it would make ESAs available on a first come first served basis because it includes a cap on the total number of students who can use them. The result is likely to be that the kids it was designed to help, kids with special needs, may not be able to get one if they don’t apply fast enough.

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