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Arizona Senate sets final vote on immigration bill

Arizona lawmakers take final action Monday on a sweeping immigration bill.

The bill has been approved by the House. Senate passage would send it to Gov. Jan Brewer.

It would make it a state crime for illegal immigrants to not have an alien registration document and require police to question people about their immigration status if there’s reason to suspect they’re illegal immigrants.

Other provisions target government agencies that hinder enforcement of immigration laws and people who hire illegal immigrants for day labor or knowingly transport them.

Supporters say the bill uncuffs law enforcement. Civil-rights advocates say it could encourage racial profiling and other abuses.

Nearly 30 opponents held a candlelight vigil outside Brewer’s home Sunday night to protest the bill.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. I would hope this bill would pass, both Senate and governor. it is up to Arizona to set some direction for the country and illegal aliens.

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