Quantcast
Home / legislature / Arizona Senate OKs bill to name Colt as state gun

Arizona Senate OKs bill to name Colt as state gun

This undated file photo provided by the Texas State Historical Association shows a Colt Single Action Army Revolver dated to 1881. Arizona is considering making the handgun that was popular in the West in the late 19th century the state's official firearm, with almost half the state's lawmakers co-sponsoring a bill honoring the single-action Army revolver. (AP Photo/Texas State Historical Association via the Dallas Morning News) MANDATORY CREDIT, NO SALES, MAGS OUT, TV OUT

This undated file photo provided by the Texas State Historical Association shows a Colt Single Action Army Revolver dated to 1881. Arizona is considering making the handgun that was popular in the West in the late 19th century the state's official firearm, with almost half the state's lawmakers co-sponsoring a bill honoring the single-action Army revolver. (AP Photo/Texas State Historical Association via the Dallas Morning News)

Arizona is one step closer to making an historic Colt revolver the state’s official firearm.

The state Senate on Tuesday approved a bill to give that status to the Colt Single-Action Army revolver, a weapon that bill supporters say contributed to the state’s heritage.

Gun-control advocates previously denounced the measure as insulting and time-wasting but the only criticism during Tuesday’s vote came from a senator who questioned whether the state should be endorsing a commercial product.

Republican Sen. Adam Driggs of Phoenix noted that Colt’s lobbyist had advocated for the bill’s passage.

The Senate’s 18-12 vote sends the bill to the House.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

 

x

Check Also

immigration-620

Ex-internal affairs chief criticizes Border Patrol training

The former head of internal affairs at U.S. Customs and Border Protection says in a Supreme Court filing that an agent who killed a Mexican teen in a cross-border shooting should be held accountable.