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Huntsman doesn’t make it onto Arizona primary ballot

In this Jan. 3, 2012, file photo Republican presidential candidate, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, campaigns in Keene, N.H., where a factory worker asked,?Who's that guy?? The complex answer from his biography is he's an Obama administration appointee running in a GOP primary where candidates have been working to out-conservative one another. He's a Mormon navigating a process typically dominated by evangelicals. He's a Harley-riding, high school dropout who frequents taco stands, and the son of a billionaire businessman. But what Huntsman, 51, would have you know, first and foremost: ?I can get elected.? (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

The Arizona secretary of state’s office says Jon Huntsman has failed to qualify for the state’s presidential primary.

A spokesman for Secretary of State Ken Bennett says the former Utah governor filed paperwork a few hours before Monday’s 5 p.m. deadline, but that it was missing a notarized signature from the candidate.

Huntsman spokesman Tim Miller says the campaign submitted what was required and will aggressively challenge the ruling to get on the ballot.

Arizona’s presidential preference primary is scheduled for Feb. 28.

It’s a Republican-dominated affair because President Barack Obama faces no opposition for the Democratic nomination.

Major GOP candidates Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, Mitt Romney, Rick Perry and Ron Paul made the ballot, as did 24 other people.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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