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Tucson rampage spurs talk of greater Hill security

Wilson Livingood, Sergeant at Arms, U.S. House of Representatives; Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C.; Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo.; Steve Lawrence, chief of staff to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif.; Barry Jackson chief of staff to House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio; Del. Madeleine Bordallo, D-Guam; Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga.; and Senate Sergeant at Arms Terry Gainer. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Members of Congress and staff members observe a moment of silence for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and other shooting victims, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, on the East Steps of the Capitol on Capitol Hill in Washington. Giffords was shot Saturday in a Tucson shooting rampage that left six people dead. Pictured from ninth left to right: Wilson Livingood, Sergeant at Arms, U.S. House of Representatives; Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C.; Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo.; Steve Lawrence, chief of staff to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif.; Barry Jackson chief of staff to House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio; Del. Madeleine Bordallo, D-Guam; Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga.; and Senate Sergeant at Arms Terry Gainer. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

The Senate’s sergeant-at-arms says he’s against members of Congress arming themselves to increase their safety in the wake of the shooting rampage in Arizona.

Terrance Gainer tells ABC’s “Good Morning America” that “I don’t think it’s a good idea.”

Several ideas have been discussed for increasing security in the wake of Saturday’s shooting spree in Tucson that left Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona gravely wounded.

Gainer says threats to members of the Senate increased over the past year — to 49. But he said he considers the number small given all the interactions that lawmakers have with constituents. Asked about public officials arming themselves, Gainer says, “I don’t think introducing more guns into the situation is going to be helpful.”

A security briefing for lawmakers is scheduled for Wednesday.

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