Quantcast
Home / Featured News / Ducey stands by ABOR, says tuition rates are constitutional

Ducey stands by ABOR, says tuition rates are constitutional

Gov. Doug Ducey chats Thursday with Sandra Watson, president of the Arizona Commerce Authority, ahead of the meeting of the board. (Photo by Howard Fischer/Capitol Media Services)

Gov. Doug Ducey chats Thursday with Sandra Watson, president of the Arizona Commerce Authority, ahead of the meeting of the board. (Photo by Howard Fischer/Capitol Media Services)

Arizona’s three universities are in compliance with constitutional requirements to keep instruction “as nearly free as possible,” Gov. Doug Ducey said Thursday, despite what Attorney General Mark Brnovich contends.

“Our universities are accessible and affordable,” the governor said.

The governor said he and lawmakers had to make some difficult decisions in prior years, making sharp cuts in funding for higher education and other priorities. It is only recently that the state has started to restore some of those cuts.

What that means, he said, is that the Board of Regents is doing the best it can to keep tuition not only affordable but maintain a high level of education, with U.S. News and World Report saying Arizona State University is the No. 1 most innovative school in the country, “beating out MIT and Stanford.”

“So by those metrics I think the universities are oasises of excellence,” Ducey said. “And they are also quite a value.”

More to the point, the governor said he believes the regents, in setting tuition — and even in imposing sharp increases during the past 15 years — are keeping the cost of instruction within what the constitution requires.

Ducey, in his comments Sept. 14, did more than disagree with Brnovich’s conclusion that the tuition is unconstitutionally too high. He also took a slap at the attorney general for seeking to resolve the issue by filing suit — and doing so without first talking to the regents.

“I’m not a big fan of lawsuits,” the governor said. “When I can I like to reduce the number of lawsuits rather than expand them.”

And Ducey worried that, no matter what the results, the taxpayers could be the losers.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich announces a lawsuit against the Arizona Board of Regents on Sept. 8. The suit alleges ABOR is not adhering to a constitutional requirement that tuition for residents attending state universities be “nearly as free as possible.” (Photo by Katie Campbell/Arizona Capitol Times)

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich announces a lawsuit against the Arizona Board of Regents on Sept. 8. The suit alleges ABOR is not adhering to a constitutional requirement that tuition for residents attending state universities be “nearly as free as possible.” (Photo by Katie Campbell/Arizona Capitol Times)

There was no immediate response from Brnovich.

On a related note, Ducey said that, as far as he’s concerned, those in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program should be able to attend state universities by paying the same tuition charged to other Arizona residents.

“I’ve always thought that a child that graduates from an Arizona high school is certainly an Arizona student and certainly should have access under in-state tuition inside our universities,” he said.

But the governor acknowledged that view is complicated by the 2006 voter-approved law which prohibits the use of state dollars to subsidize the tuition of those who are not legally in this country. And the state Court of Appeals earlier this year said that includes DACA recipients, making in-state tuition off limits to them.

That case is on appeal to the Arizona Supreme Court.

Ducey said he agrees with President Trump, who just announced he would phase out the program and that the Obama administration acted illegally in creating the program in 2012. But the governor said he also agrees with Trump that the real solution not only to the question of tuition but the entire fate of the 800,000 “dreamers” in Arizona and 28,000 in Arizona should be “resolved by the action of Congress.”

The governor said his belief that the universities are complying with the constitutional requirements for instruction to be “as nearly free as possible” is based on a 2007 Supreme Court ruling. In that case, the justices threw out a claim by some students that a 39 percent increase in tuition put the schools out of compliance.

“It’s already been litigated and answered,” Ducey said.

In actuality, the high court never decided whether the tuition hike passed constitutional muster. Instead, the justices said this was “a nonjusticable political question,” with the size of each university’s budget — and the amount of tuition that needs to be raised to support them — “left to the discretion of the board.”

And the justices said that question of tuition is also determined by the amount of aid provided by the Legislature, something they said is totally within the purview of the elected lawmakers.

Ducey said that, from his perspective, the regents are doing the best they can — and acting legally — within the context of the state dollars available.

“We inherited a $1 billion deficit when we came into office,” the governor said.

“The state’s financial house was not in order,” he continued. “We made some very difficult decisions in those first several years.”

That included a $99 million reduction in state funding for universities in Ducey’s first term in office, the largest single one-year cut in the schools’ history.

Now, Ducey said, the state is no longer running a deficit “and we’re able to invest again.”

That investment, though, has been nowhere near what was taken.

For example, last year’s budget provided an additional $32 million.

But there was less there than meets the eye, with just $8 million to restore general funding that was cut.  And of the balance $19 million was one time funding that went away this current school year, replaced with $15 million in one-time dollars.

But Ducey said he remains committed to the idea that every student who wants a university education in Arizona has access to it.

“And I’m confident that they can,” he said.

While acknowledging the limited dollars for higher education, Ducey also defended the tax cuts he has pushed through the Legislature.

“It’s a balance of what we want to have in terms of an economic climate and what we want to have in terms of investment in universities,” he said.

He said they are paying off in new firms moving to Arizona from places like California.

“They’re coming here because of our business climate,” the governor said. “And they’re getting out of the high taxes and regulation of California.

Nor is Ducey going to ease up.

“We’re going to improve our tax situation and be lighter on regulation and grow jobs for our state and our citizens,” he said.

One comment

  1. It is a waste of taxpayer money to have the Attorney General spend tax payer money to sue ABOR who will use tax defend the lawsuit when all of that money should be going toward the universities.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

 

x

Check Also

A federal appeals court rejected Todd Fries' argument that his conviction on chemical weapons charges should not have been taken into account when he was sentenced for bomb possession.

Court of Appeals sides with Pima County, no bid necessary for project

The state Court of Appeals on Thursday said competitive bidding laws do not apply when counties are trying to lure a specific company to the area.