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2 doctors for incapacitated patient who gave birth leave

FILE - This Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, file photo shows Hacienda HealthCare in Phoenix. State regulators reportedly wanted to remove developmentally disabled patients from a Phoenix long-term care facility years before a woman in a vegetative state gave birth. The Arizona Republic reported Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019, that Hacienda HealthCare faced a criminal investigation in 2016. The facility allegedly billed the state some $4 million in bogus 2014 charges for wages, transportation, housekeeping, maintenance and supplies. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

FILE – This Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, file photo shows Hacienda HealthCare in Phoenix.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Two doctors who cared for an incapacitated woman who gave birth as a result of a sexual assault are no longer providing medical services at the long-term care center in Phoenix.
Hacienda HealthCare says Sunday that one has resigned. The other has been suspended.
The victim in her 20s had been in Hacienda’s care since she became incapacitated at age 3 after suffering a near-drowning.
She gave birth Dec. 29.
The sexual assault triggered a police investigation and reviews by regulators.
Hacienda CEO Bill Timmons resigned after news surfaced of the assault.
Investigators gathered DNA from men who worked there.
Authorities examined an unrelated allegation that two workers there had yelled at and hit another patient, but police spokesman Tommy Thompson said investigators were unable to corroborate the allegation.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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