Quantcast
Home / Opinion / Letters to the Editor / Tougher penalties needed for pedophiles

Tougher penalties needed for pedophiles

I am a local political activist. I brought up the issue of child endangerment to the local press during the school override election for Apache Junction Unified School District. I also raised the issue during city council meetings and in the blogs.

I demanded a 10-year mandatory jail sentence for sex crimes. I also demanded improved background screening. But, nothing has been done.

On Feb. 19, the third case of alleged pedophilia was reported in our local press since last October – four months and three cases – involving people in the Apache Junction school system.

High school teacher Johnathan Krieger (also known as John Snell and Johnathan Raye) was arrested for alleged sexual contact with a minor.

He has been a teacher at Sequoia Charter School in Mesa and Apache Trail High School in Apache Junction.

I believe routine fingerprinting and background checks would help the state avoid problems tracking suspected child molesters who use different names. There’s a clear cultural aversion to thorough background checking and fingerprinting in Arizona.

The penalty for the last two offenders in Apache Junction was simply 20 years’ probation – not even one day of jail. I don’t think this is a deterrent.

I believe an emergency shutdown should occur in all Arizona public schools similar to what was talked about for H1N1 virus or for weather. This is a statewide problem, and it’s an emergency.

– Elliott E. Fisher, Apache Junction

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

 

x

Check Also

(Photo by Ellen O'Brien)

In the end, Arizona must speak with one voice (access required)

Coming to agreement on how best to marshal the state’s water resources and to create sustainability for future Arizonans is among the toughest challenges that leaders in our region can take on. Arizona has chosen to act now. We are opting to improve on the work of previous generations of state leaders to ensure that the word “crisis” remains banished from Arizona’s water lexicon.