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Lawmakers reconvene to mull unemployment proposal

The Arizona Legislature will reconvene Monday afternoon to consider Gov. Jan Brewer’s push to keep 20 weeks of federally funded extended unemployment benefits flowing to thousands of Arizonans.

The Legislature started a special session Friday to consider Brewer’s proposal but lawmakers took no action.

Top Republican legislative leaders say there wasn’t enough support for the proposal without also taking action on long-term measures such as business tax cuts and regulatory changes to spur the economy.

But Brewer rejected the suggestion and says lawmakers should still address the unemployment benefits issue.

Brewer is trying to get lawmakers to change a formula in state law so jobless Arizonans could continue to receive the benefits.

About 15,000 Arizonans are now receiving the additional 20 weeks of benefits.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

One comment

  1. keith gullickson

    Why don’t we have the Legislature try to live on $240 a week, the next lowest to Mississippi. In an ideal world none of us would be wanting for a job but it is “their” policies that have put us in this position. When we elect idiots and egomaniacs this is what we get.

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