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Times Past

The Immigrant Priest (access required)

The Territory of Arizona had been served first by Spanish and then by Mexican priests, but the revolutionary Mexican government expelled the Spaniards after 1822, and, following the Mexican War (with the United States) Mexican priests withdrew from the Arizona ...

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Arizona Women in Medicine

Tuberculosis was the scourge of the early 20th century life in the United States. Health seekers always were searching for a good climate for recovery, and it didn’t take long for Tucson, with its dry, warm climate to attract them. ...

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Flagstaff’s Fast Car Race

The Eighth Annual Fast Car Race, sponsored by the Mark A. Moore American Legion Post, attracted West Coast driving sensations such as Bud Rose, Rajo Jack, Wally Schock, Earl Evans and Shorty Ellysen. They brought cars usually seen only in ...

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Two Tucson Meteorites

The two meteor fragments were used as blacksmith’s anvils in the Tucson Presidio in the 1700s and were highly valued. Early Tucson visitors invariably commented on them as curiosities. All early reports say that the meteorites were found in the ...

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Marcos de Niza Memorial (access required)

Fray Marcos de Niza’s explorations led directly to the expedition of Francisco Vazquez de Coronado, who laid claim to the entire Southwest in the name of the Spanish crown and who was the forerunner of European settlement of Arizona. Spain ...

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Emery’s Cooperative

Although he was called “judge” in Tucson, Alfred John Emery had no legal training and never sat as a judge. The title was honorific. In fact, Emery was a dairy and poultry farmer all his life, and a man with ...

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The First Gray Ladies

The Tucson chapter of the Red Cross was founded in 1916, just four years after Arizona became a state. At the time, a civil war was raging in Mexico and Pancho Villa was conducting raids along the U.S. border. The ...

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Father Owen da Silva

Father Owen was born Bill Silva on August 6. 1906, in Santa Barbara, California, near the old Franciscan Mission there. His Portuguese father and Irish mother were devout Catholics, and Owen was determined on the priesthood from childhood. After his ...

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Death on Sacramento Hill

A Bucyrus steam shovel, a modern piece of equipment, symbolized a new style of mining in the copper camp – Phelps Dodge had just begun open-cut mining operations on Sacramento Hill. The decision to dig the ground out instead of ...

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