Quantcast
Home / agencies / Marijuana consumption translates into 58,600 bags of Oreos

Marijuana consumption translates into 58,600 bags of Oreos

marijuana-pot-weed-web

Arizona’s more than 114,000 medical marijuana patients smoked, ate or otherwise consumed more than 29 tons of the drug last year.

That’s more than half of a fully-loaded tractor trailer.

Or, looking at it another way, it’s the equivalent of more than 58,600 16-ounce bags of Oreos.

That’s a 52 percent increase in the amount of pot legally sold in 2015. And the 2015 numbers themselves were double the prior year.

What makes the 2016 figure even more amazing is that the number of medical marijuana users has increased in the past year by less than 35 percent.

Doing the math, that means the average medical marijuana user consumed just under eight ounces of the drug last year, though the odds are some smoked more and some smoked less.

And if the average price of an ounce of marijuana is in the $300 range, that means medical marijuana users spent more than $281 million on the drug.

The latest report from the state Department of Health Services also found that male patients statewide outnumber females by a margin of close to 2-1.

The 2010 voter-approved law allows those with certain specified medical conditions and a doctor’s recommendation to obtain up to 2 1/2 ounces of marijuana every two weeks.

Those conditions include glaucoma, seizures and nausea. And, more recently, the health department concluded that those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder also can use the drug for treatment of their symptoms.

But the vast majority of people who have the state-issued ID cars have qualified under the broad catch-all category of “chronic pain.’’

The health department has the figures because the 2010 law requires that medical marijuana users obtain their drugs from one of what are now 131 state-licensed dispensaries. The only exception is for those who live more than 25 miles away from a retail outlet, a figure that is only about 1 percent of the total.

Health department figures also show that the vast majority of what was purchased — more than 90 percent — was in the form of whole leaves and flowers that can be smoked or made into tea. About 6 percent is in the form of edibles like cookies and lollipops, with the balance in other forms like pills and liquids.

Not surprisingly, half of the patients reside in Maricopa County, with Pima County far behind at 13 percent. That is followed with the 6,332 patients in Yavapai County — about 5.5 percent of the total users — even though its population is only slightly more than half of Pinal County.

The report comes on the heels of voters narrowly defeating Proposition 205 which would have allowed any adult to use marijuana. Proponents have said they intend to try again, whether in 2018 or 2020.

 

2 comments

  1. Your sixth paragraph should hsve been your first, the average medical marijuana user — who is using the plant to teat a chronic condition — consumed a little more than half an ounce of marijuana per month, hardly news to write home about. So why the weirdly sensationalist headline, so unlike ACT?

  2. So, how many tractor trailer loads of booze did people drink, and how many bags of Oreos does that equal?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

 

x

Check Also

Cutline: In this screen capture of a political ad, APS is uses a picture of the ballot, with the revised language added by a top aide to Attorney General Mark Brnovich, to convince voters to reject Proposition 127.

AG’s office changes wording on Prop 127 ballot

A key aide to Attorney General Mark Brnovich altered language of the ballot description of Proposition 127 that the state's top elections officer called "eyebrow raising'' and the lawyer for initiative organizers said is designed to help Arizona Public Service convince voters to reject it.