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Capitol Quotes: August 5, 2011

“When I look back, it seems like a very logical progression, but I never would have predicted it.” — Clint Bolick, director of the Goldwater Institute’s Scharf-Norton Center for Constitutional Litigation, on Jordan Rose’s evolution from handling zoning and real estate cases to big political issues.

“That’s the old argument that’s as old as politics. You’re going to lunch with somebody — what do they expect and what do they get from that?” — Sen. John McComish, R-Phoenix, on criticism that ALEC gives corporations inappropriate influence over legislation.

“Russell is a very strong member of the church. He’s very active and faithful and he’s not going against the church at all, and the church has certainly never, as far as I know and I still keep in touch with Russell, given him a call or said ‘you’re out of line.’” — Former Sen. Karen Johnson, defending Senate President Russell Pearce

“They’d better shift into a lower gear.” — Democratic consultant George Cunningham, on potential candidates who are eying U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords’ congressional seat.

“I don’t delude myself that much of what I do is big in the grand scheme of things.” — Sen. Don Shooter, R-Yuma, on the Tea Party license plate debate.

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These members of the Martin Gold family are standing in front of the first large steam engine and threshing machine in the Phoenix area. They are, from left, Martin Gold; his daughter, Rose; an unidentified farmhand; Gold’s daughter, Helen; Dave Martinez; an unidentified young woman; and Gold’s stepson, Ulysses Schofield. The photograph was taken during the harvest in July 1914. Gold brought the first steam thresher to Phoenix.

Martin Gold, Phoenix pioneer (access required)

By all accounts, Martin Gold was a humble and hard-working man. He was popular among the immigrant community, especially the Mexicans—who called him Don Martin—because of his facility with languages.