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Capitol Quotes: October 24, 2014

“Judges don’t just get to do whatever the hell they want. They have to provide reasons and these reasons have to be grounded in the Constitution.” — Corporate attorney Bill Hardin, questioning the theory that rulings against gay-marriage bans are the result of judges taking the law into their own hands.  

“Look at the intent of the founders. There is nothing in there that says you have this fundamental right to marry someone of the same sex, yet they have now created this new fundamental right.” — Josh Kredit, legal counsel with the Center for Arizona Policy, commenting on the U.S. Supreme Court’s approach to gay marriage.

“We’ve gone down that road. Let’s just leave well enough alone.” — Republican Rep. T.J. Shope of Coolidge, saying he doesn’t have any appetite to bring up issues along the lines of SB1062, in the wake a judge striking down Arizona’s ban on same sex marriages.

“As governor, I would not seek to overturn existing law requiring parental consent for a minor receiving an abortion, as long as there is an opportunity for a judicial bypass for minors in dangerous or abusive situations.” — Fred DuVal, Democratic candidate for governor, in a statement explaining a comment on parental consent for minors seeking abortions.

“Petrified Forest has not been as welcoming as it could be.” — Brad Traver, superintendent of Petrified Forest National Park, offering one explanation for a drop in attendance at the park, which has mirrored the decline in visits to many of Arizona’s national parks and monuments.

“If I sit here and say there’s going to be another SB1062, everyone is going to lose their minds because it was so controversial.” — Rep. J.D. Mesnard, R-Chandler, observing that lawmakers likely will be pushing for some kind of religious liberties bill in 2015.

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