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Arizona man charged in Capitol riot appears in court

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo supporters of President Donald Trump are confronted by U.S. Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber inside the Capitol in Washington. An Arizona man seen in photos and video of the mob wearing a fur hat with horns was also charged Saturday in Wednesday's chaos. Jacob Anthony Chansley, who also goes by the name Jake Angeli, was taken into custody Saturday, Jan. 9. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

FILE – In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo supporters of President Donald Trump are confronted by U.S. Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber inside the Capitol in Washington. An Arizona man seen in photos and video of the mob wearing a fur hat with horns was also charged Saturday in Wednesday’s chaos. Jacob Anthony Chansley, who also goes by the name Jake Angeli, was taken into custody Saturday, Jan. 9. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

An Arizona man who took part in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol while sporting face paint, no shirt and a furry hat with horns made his first court appearance Monday.

A judge scheduled a detention hearing Friday for Jake Chansley, who has been jailed on misdemeanor charges since surrendering to authorities over the weekend in Phoenix. He took part in the hearing by phone from a detention facility.

The FBI identified Chansley from images taken during the riot showing his distinctive sleeve tattoos. Chansley was inside the Capitol and on the Senate dais as he carried a U.S. flag on a pole topped with a spear.

He hasn’t yet entered a plea on charges of entering a restricted building without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

His court-appointed attorney, Gerald Williams, told the judge that Chansley has been unable to eat since he was arrested Saturday. He said his client has a restricted diet, though it was unclear to Williams whether Chansley’s food issues were related to health concerns or religious reasons.

The judge ordered Williams to work with the U.S. Marshals Service to address the issue.

Chansley’s mother, Martha Chansley, told reporters outside the courthouse that her son needs an organic diet, The Arizona Republic reported.

“He gets very sick if he doesn’t eat organic food,” she said. “He needs to eat.”

Williams didn’t immediately return a call seeking comment from The Associated Press.

Chansley is among at least 90 people who have been arrested on charges stemming from Wednesday’s siege on the Capitol.

An investigator said in court records that Chansley called the FBI in Washington the day after the riot, telling investigators that he came to the nation’s capital “at the request of the president that all ‘patriots’ come to D.C. on January 6, 2021.”

Chansley has long been a fixture at Trump rallies. He also attended a November rally of Trump supporters protesting election results outside of an election office in Phoenix, holding up a sign that read, “HOLD THE LINE PATRIOTS GOD WINS.”

Rioters violently clashed with officers as they forced their way in the Capitol to try to stop Congress from certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

A police officer who was hit in the head with a fire extinguisher later died, and a woman was fatally shot by an officer as she tried climbing through the broken window of a barricaded doorway inside the Capitol. Three others died in medical emergencies. ___ This story has been corrected to show how people died related to the riot.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

3 comments

  1. Her son is a loser and NOT a patriot. Just some wack job Momma’s boy that wants attention.

  2. I feel for this man’s mother, who is going to get quite the education about how the USA thinks about people who do what her son has done in the US Capitol. That’s leaving aside the fact that the way he presents himself–screaming abuse, wearing buffalo horns and furs (in AZ!!) and makeup–looks to others: like pointless attention-seeking. I don’t know if it’s true that he’s incapable of supporting himself, but others will be wondering if his mother should have found some kind of help for him. That aside, I think it’s outrageous that he aligns himself with religious traditions that he seems to know little about and is unqualified to preach about. He is clearly a mixed-up person who has been allowed to follow a lot of false fires. The fact that he’s been emotionally and financially supported in that has led to his current situation and to his future, which looks to be several years in a federal prison where a lack of organic food is going to be the least of his problems.

  3. Let me add that she may want to be aware that it is not always possible to be in contact with federal prisoners. They have limited opportunities to use a telephone. They are moved from one prison to another without any notice, so she may think he’s in Prison A only to learn that no. he’s suddenly moved elsewhere . . . he’s unlikely to be right down the street and easy to visit, and if there is any chance he suffers from a disability or mental illness she should alert the defense attorney asap; he may have greater protection from the rest of the prison population if he has received such a diagnosis (or if he can be diagnosed in that way). It does seem that he may have some mental problems; entirely sane people are aware that if you want to persuade other humans to follow you, dressing up in furs and buffalo horns, being unable to pay rent or hold down a job, and spending time shouting at others without noticeably gaining followers is entirely ineffective.

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