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Author Archives: Guest Opinion

Results show why demand for charter schools remains strong

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What Arizona’s charter school revolution has taught us is that educational approaches can be as diverse as the ever-changing needs of Arizona’s students. And thanks to our governor and state Legislature, those diverse needs are being served. It would be a shame for parents and students if the charter school revolution came to an end because a handful of anti-charter advocates managed to convince an even smaller group of reporters that Arizona neither needs nor deserves choice in education. After all, if charter schools were not doing a good job overall, why are so many students flocking to them?

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No matter the vote, empowerment scholarships have helped many

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In November, Arizona voters will decide whether expanding the state’s Empowerment Scholarship Account program makes sense. It was originally started to help the parents of disabled children, foster children, or parents who are active military. It evolved, with little controversy, to include adopted children, children attending D/F rated schools, and those in Native American communities. About 5,000 children are now using the scholarships to attend private schools or be home-schooled, if they don’t feel the public school system is right for their special, unique needs.

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Cheap water, not lax regulation, at core of Arizona shortage

For three days in August, hundreds of residents in Parker, on the banks of the Colorado River, went without running water.  The town’s provider, Brooke Water, LLC, had a series of five water leaks and a valve break. The Arizona Corporation Commission later investigated. (Photo by Joshua Bowling/Cronkite News)

The recent New York Times article, “The Water Wars of Arizona,” goes into detail about Arizona’s diminishing water resources and blames the problem entirely on “lax regulation,” which, the author says, has enticed large corporate farms to come and suck up all the water. I’m sure they have. But “lax regulation” doesn’t come close to getting to the heart of the problem: water is too darn cheap in Arizona.

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Bribery case part of cancerous trend in political prosecutions

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There is a rot spreading through the nation’s criminal justice system, and federal investigators and prosecutors in Arizona are showing symptoms of the disease. Prosecutors nationwide are bringing extraordinarily aggressive cases against Americans engaged in the political process, and federal prosecutors in Phoenix have recently concluded — and lost, due to a hung jury followed by a dismissal — a trial in which they accused four American citizens of a conspiracy to bribe a member of the Arizona Corporation Commission.

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