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Iraqi man accused in Arizona explosion indicted

Iraqi man accused in Arizona explosion indicted

This undated photo provided by the Pinal County Sheriff's Office, Monday Dec. 3, 2012 shows Abdullatif Ali Aldosary, a suspect in the bombing of the U.S. Social Security Office in Casa Grande, Ariz. Forty-seven-year-old Abdullatif Ali Aldosary is charged in a federal complaint with maliciously damaging federal property by means of explosives and being a felon in possession of a firearm. He's scheduled for an initial court appearance Monday in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Pinal County Sheriffs Office)

An Iraqi man charged with detonating a homemade explosive device outside a Social Security Administration office building in Casa Grande has been indicted by a federal grand jury.

Abdullatif Ali Aldosary is indicted on charges of maliciously damaging federal property by means of explosives and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Authorities say the 47-year-old researched bomb-making materials and gathered chemicals before detonating an explosive outside the Social Security office last week. No one was injured in the blast.

Aldosary is now set for arraignment in Phoenix on Tuesday. His public defender didn’t immediately return calls for comment.

Officials say he came to the U.S. legally in 1997, but was denied a green card because he fought with anti-government forces trying to overthrow former Iraq dictator Saddam Hussein. He has since re-applied.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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