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Home / Opinion / Commentary / Prohibiting forest health management practices protects land ‘to death’ (access required)

Prohibiting forest health management practices protects land ‘to death’ (access required)

President Trump’s executive order calling for a review of expansive executive land designations under the Antiquities Act of 1906 has predictably generated a volume of debate and dire predictions. Missing from the discussion is thoughtful dialogue about the critical role of multiple-use management in natural resources conservation and the sometimes dire consequences to our natural resources of removing such tools from the pallet of management actions and possibilities. This is all done in the name of “protection,” but sometimes we literally love our most special places to death.

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Certain facts bear repeating over and over

President Trump’s executive order calling for a review of expansive executive land designations under the Antiquities Act of 1906 has predictably generated a volume of ...

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