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Family overcomes bad hand

To the editor:

America likes comeback stories. And so does Arizona.

For many years Kevin DeMenna had a lobbying practice second to few at the Arizona state Capitol. Then some personal health challenges and a legal situation put a dent in the business. Over these years the business had evolved to include Kevin’s sons, a construct many fathers would be proud of, and relish.

The circumstances were such that it might have been easy to give up or go separate ways, even if it meant sons departing from Dad. But that’s not what this family did. That’s impressive. They stuck together. They appear to be coming out the other side. Serendipitously, the Phoenix New Times just named the Demenna’s government relations business “Best Family Business.”

I am not being paid to opine this way nor do any of the Demennas know I wrote this. But many years ago Kevin Demenna was a partner with Bob Robb and Fred Duval and gave (me) a shot with their notable public relations and public affairs firm. To say that training was formative for me is an understatement. And when this intrepid public relations and politico left after four years to start my own business at the grand old age of 26, I always remember what Kevin said: “I wish you were a stock so I could invest in you.” Turns out that would have been a very good investment. But more importantly they are words I repeat to others to this day.

In his own way, Kevin was rooting for me even as I was leaving. That says a lot about a person. And I root for Kevin as he and his family are coming back.

Perhaps it will be replicated by others in the future, though their particular circumstances are different.

For now, however, the body politic is a better place for one family’s determination to overcome a bad hand, because they remained arm in arm.

Jason Rose

President & co-ounder

Rose+Moser+Allyn Public & Online Relations

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